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How does being a teacher’s assistant benefit you if you are not getting a degree in education?

How does being a teacher’s assistant benefit you if you are not getting a degree in education?How does being a teacher’s assistant benefit you if you are not getting a degree in education?2021-11-25 20:11:02Mr_鄂

  1. It demonstrates your ability to lead others
  2. Even if you aren’t in education, there’s a fairly good chance you will end up training people or teaching people if you reach any leadership level
  3. Teaching something helps you learn it more thoroughly. I happened to TA a class that was the undergraduate version of the doctoral seminar I was taking at the same time. It was an excellent way of learning, analyzing and digesting the theories, plus the challenge of translating it to younger folks with less experience. It gives you a greater level of understanding.

Can you become a teacher with associate's degree?

Can you become a teacher with associate's degree?2021-08-02 12:48:25Mr_晏

Teaching an academic class in the United States requires you to have an advanced degree in that subject. You also have to take and pass a test on that subject as well as a test on reading and writing.

If getting a 4 year undergraduate degree and a 2 year master’s degree is too difficult then I am going to say that teaching academics is not for you.

There are other options for teaching that aren’t academic. In the U.S. we have vocational high schools. Vocational high schools teach academics as well as vocations. Vocations like carpentry, plumbing, graphic design, etc. To teach in a vocational high school you do not have to have a four year degree but you do need to have a few years of experience working in the field you want to teach and you also need to pass a test showing that you know the material.

You can Google vocational high schools.

My final question would be; why do you want to be a teacher?

Does getting a degree really mean that you are educated? What really, is the definition of being educated?

Does getting a degree really mean that you are educated? What really, is the definition of being educated?2021-06-27 07:24:37Mr_邹

Everyone feels differently about it honestly.

I think being educated is being well-rounded in a lot of different courses/areas. It’s not about knowing the intricacies of Shakespeare. It’s day-to-day things.

So for high school, Take a lot of math, English, and science; A world language; Physical health classes; Business classes; trade classes (shop, welding, or electronics); and computer classes.

Then in college, for your generals, take other classes (business, psych, poetry, math, and science, and communications). Take history if you can, I missed out on that.

Join the military see the world and understand how to be a self-sufficient.

That’s my idea of it.

Take high school as if you are going to University, go to community college and get your generals, then join the military… after that, keep reading and use your knowledge the best you can.

Do what you can though… also hobbies should include music if you aren’t in band or choir.

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.

-Robert A. Heinlein

Why does getting a better education benefit attending a college?

Why does getting a better education benefit attending a college?2021-07-25 06:59:33Mr_奚

If I'm understanding the question, getting a better educations benefits you in college because you are better prepared for the college experience. College moves at a much faster pace than high school. Also, it's completely up to you to do your homework (or not), and it's completely up to you to decide if you need extra help and figure out how to get it.

At 2 year schools or community colleges, they offer an entrance exam. If you are not on a college level you would have to take remedial classes first (which you pay for).

Do you need a master’s degree to be a teacher?

Do you need a master’s degree to be a teacher?2021-08-01 03:26:15Mr_牟

Ohio tried to pass such a law, but after intense protest from teachers, it never made it through. Nonetheless, The Ohio State University and many others stopped the bachelor programs and made a master’s the only education degree that they offered.

In terms of pay, (at least in Ohio) a master’s pays more than a bachelor’s, so with a master’s you start out making more money. The problem is that if you have a master’s and there are lots of other applicants with only bachelor’s degrees, you’re likely to be passed over, because you start out making more money, meaning that the school system has to pay you more, when they can avoid the costs by hiring someone with a bachelor’s degree.

I am told of some schools where no one has a master’s degree. Money might be the issue.

You can read more of my thoughts on Quora at: Jeffrey Jackson

Jeffrey Neil Jackson

B.A., B.A., B.S., M.Ed., SHRM-CP

Is being a teacher worth the salary you get?

Is being a teacher worth the salary you get?2021-06-20 10:45:17Mr_申屠

Depends.

It depends on the school you work at, the students you teach, their parents and the hours you put in per week, and the bureaucracy.

Personally, I'd much rather work for less in a school full of well behaved kids that are taught proper manners than get a ton of money wrecking my nerves in an environment where kids nor their parents give a shit and the school board think it's fine. Why? Because that shit is detrimental to my self worth and self esteem. Ain't nobody's teenager more important than my personal sanity.

In Estonia, the salary is alright. Sure, it covers my costs and I have enough left over to attend to my wants but I can't afford to go abroad twice a year, although I don't really need to either. It also depends on my workload. This year I worked part time in two schools and made nearly full time pay. This year I will be paid less, but I will have more free time to work on myself and give private lessons with a higher hourly rate.

And besides, it beats being a waitress or cashier. Less hours, more pay, more control.

Can you become a science teacher without a degree in education but have a degree in biology?

Can you become a science teacher without a degree in education but have a degree in biology?2021-08-08 13:05:33Mr_子车

Depends on the state. Most every state has pathways to certification for those with degrees but not in education.

For example, in alabama there is a provisional certificate in a teaching field (PCTF) that you must hold for 3 years in order to get your teachers license, but you can start teaching day 1 with your 1st year PCTF.

Basically, the board of education in your county or city should have a certification officer that can help you begin.

Alabama’s process basically involves taking a content knowledge test called the Praxis, another basic skills test, 4 college classes involving things like materials and methods, special ed learners, classroom management. I was able to take these entirely online from a college on the state approved college list. You have to complete 2 classes a year minimum. I did most of mine the first summer after my 1st year teaching. Lastly, there is a final requirement involving the PLT (principles of learning and teaching) test or edTPA.

Clearly, there is a huge cash grab. Each test cost money, college tuition, and feed to apply for each year’s provisional certificate. In short, it is not cheap to come from industry and when you factor in most people are taking a pay cut then these alternate pathways to certification could better help get people become teachers. How many people are doing this is anyones guess who doesn’t work at the state department and has access to the numbers. Also, I wonder what the success rate is too. There are penalties for not completing like never being able to do it again for 10 years.

hole this helps.

What's the difference between an Assistant teacher and a teacher Assistant?

What's the difference between an Assistant teacher and a teacher Assistant?2021-06-27 08:41:49Mr_倪

An assistant teacher is a qualified teacher but not the lead teacher in an arena or subject. Most teachers first post is as an assistant teacher. A teaching assistant (or teacher assistant) is not a qualified teacher but someone who helps a teacher and may have some relevant skills. For example they could be attached to specific students with learning difficulties and they may be more knowledgeable about those interventions that are most helpful to ‘their’ students. However, they should not impede the lesson. It always annoyed be when I called the students to listen and the teaching assistant thought she could carry on talking!

What steps have you gone through to become a teacher when you have a degree that is not in education?

What steps have you gone through to become a teacher when you have a degree that is not in education?2021-06-24 22:02:13Mr_段

At least four colleges in Chicago offer “post-bachelor teaching certification courses” just for people in that situation. They’re designed for working adult. I went though one at my original alma mater, DePaul University. I opted to take a few extra classes and get my Masters in Education while I was at it, but there’s options to not do that too. At least, there were back when I did it.

There are also post-bachelor pre-medical and pre-law courses too, for people who already have a degree, but in the wrong major.

I suspect that there’s a huge market nowadays for people in their mid to late 20s who, several years post-graduation, regret that their B.A. degrees didn’t lead to jobs with high enough wages to raise a family, so they’re eager to go back and get a more useful credential.

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